Capital Books Pvt. Ltd. Educating the World

Proteomics in Food Science - 1st Edition

Subject ISBN Author Publisher Number of Pages Title Year Price
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9780128040072 Michelle Colgrave Elsevier 538 Proteomics in Food Science - 1st Edition 2017 $ 150.00
Author: Michelle Colgrave
Description: Proteomics in Food Science: From Farm to Fork is a solid reference providing concepts and practical applications of proteomics for those in various disciplines of food science. The book covers a range of methods for elucidating the identity or composition of specific proteins in foods or cells related to food science, from spoilage organisms, to edible components. A variety of analytical platforms are described, ranging from the usage of simple electrophoresis, to more sophisticated mass spectrometry and bio-informatic platforms. The book is designed for food scientists, technologists, food industry workers, microbiologists, and public health workers, and can also be a valuable reference book for students.
Table of Content: Section 1. Application to Plants — Cereals, Nuts, Pulses, and Fruits Chapter 1. Postharvest Proteomics of Perishables • 1.1. Introduction • 1.2. Factors Affecting Postharvest Quality • 1.3. Proteome Level Responses of Perishables to Main Postharvest Abiotic Stresses • 1.4. Perspectives Chapter 2. Proteomics of Rice—Our Most Valuable Food Crop • 2.1. Introduction • 2.2. Chemical and Physical Principles • 2.3. Synopsis of Analytical Techniques • 2.4. Proteomic Analysis of Stress Response in Rice • 2.5. Conclusions and Future Outlook Chapter 3. Proteomics as a Tool to Understand Maize Biology and to Improve Maize Crop • 3.1. Introduction • 3.2. Proteomics of Maize Development • 3.3. Stress-Associated Maize Proteomics • 3.4. Nutrient Imbalance • 3.5. Heterosis-Associated Maize Proteomes • 3.6. Seed Viability • 3.7. Safety Assessment of Genetically Modified Maize • 3.8. Maize Allergenic Proteins Chapter 4. Proteomics of Wheat Flour • 4.1. Introduction • 4.2. Wheat Flour Proteins • 4.3. Wheat Flour Quality • 4.4. Immunogenic Potential of Wheat Flour • 4.5. Developing Proteomic Maps of Wheat Flour • 4.6. The Progression From Descriptive Proteomics to Comparative and Translational Proteomics • 4.7. Understanding How the Growth Environment of the Plant Affects Protein Composition of Wheat Flour • 4.8. Defining Protein Components of Glutenin Polymer Fractions • 4.9. Combining Genetic and Proteomic Approaches to Establish Links Between Specific Proteins and Flour Quality • 4.10. Evaluating Immunogenic Potential of Wheat Flour • 4.11. Other Proteomic Studies Chapter 5. Barley Grain Proteomics • 5.1. Introduction • 5.2. Proteomic Analysis Techniques Used in Analysis of Barley, Barley Malt, and Beer • 5.3. Barley Grain and Malting Barley Proteome • 5.4. Abiotic and Biotic Stress in Barley • 5.5. Beer Proteomics • 5.6. Conclusions and Final Remarks Chapter 6. Proteomics of Soybean Plants • 6.1. Introduction • 6.2. Soybean Development and Cultivation • 6.3. Soybean as a Food Material • 6.4. Conclusions Chapter 7. Proteomics of Hazelnut (Corylus avellana) • 7.1. Introduction • 7.2. Protein Family Classification and Functional Annotation • 7.3. Molecular Characterization and Proteomics • 7.4. Hazelnut Allergens • 7.5. Detection of “Hidden” Hazelnut Allergens: Proteomic-Based Methods • 7.6. Conclusions Chapter 8. Proteomic as a Tool to Study Fruit Ripening • 8.1. Introduction • 8.2. Proteomics and Ripening of Climacteric Fruits • 8.3. Proteomics and Ripening of Nonclimacteric Fruits • 8.4. Commonly Regulated Proteins During Fruit Ripening • 8.5. Conclusions and Future Perspectives Section 2. Application to Farm Animals – Meats, Dairy, and Eggs Chapter 9. From Farm to Fork: Proteomics in Farm Animal Care and Food Production • 9.1. Introduction • 9.2. General Aspects • 9.3. Animal/Veterinary Aspects • 9.4. Production Aspects • 9.5. Outlook Chapter 10. Proteomics of Color in Fresh Muscle Foods • 10.1. Introduction • 10.2. Proteomics Applied to Meat Color • 10.3. Myoglobin Chemistry • 10.4. Lipid Oxidation–Induced Myoglobin Oxidation • 10.5. Primary Structure of Myoglobins • 10.6. Role of Muscle Proteome in Fresh Meat Color • 10.7. Conclusions Chapter 11. Proteomic Investigations of Beef Tenderness • 11.1. Introduction • 11.2. Proteomics in the Field of Meat Science and Investigations on Beef Tenderness • 11.3. Protein Biomarkers of Meat Tenderness • 11.4. Protein Biomarkers and Their Role in Determining Beef Tenderness • 11.5. Conclusions and Future Prospects Chapter 12. Protein Modifications in Cooked Pork Products • 12.1. Introduction • 12.2. Proteomic Studies of Cooked Meat Products • 12.3. Spot Identification by MALDI–TOF MS • 12.4. Supramolecular Rebuilding of Meat Proteins in Cooked Pork Products • 12.5. Conclusions Chapter 13. Poultry and Rabbit Meat Proteomics • 13.1. Introduction • 13.2. Poultry Muscle and Meat Proteomics: A Tool to Study Muscle Growth and Allow Breed Differentiation • 13.3. Poultry Muscle and Meat Proteomics: A Tool to Study Restraint- and Transport-Derived Stress • 13.4. Proteomics and Poultry Meat: The Special Case of Foie Gras • 13.5. Rabbit Muscle and Meat Proteomics • 13.6. Conclusions and Future Perspectives Chapter 14. Using Peptidomics to Determine the Authenticity of Processed Meat • 14.1. Introduction • 14.2. Authenticity Issues • 14.3. Protein and Peptide Discrimination • 14.4. Analytical Approaches • 14.5. Authentication of Processed Meat • 14.6. Authentication of Proteins of Nonmeat Origin • 14.7. Conclusions Chapter 15. Proteomic Characterization of Nonenzymatic Modifications Induced in Bovine Milk Following Thermal Treatments • 15.1. Introduction • 15.2. Single Protein-Centered Characterization of the Modifications Induced by Thermal Treatments • 15.3. Proteomic Characterization of the Modifications Induced by Thermal Treatments • 15.4. Shotgun Proteomic Characterization of the Modifications Induced by Thermal Treatments • 15.5. Conclusions and Future Outlook Chapter 16. Proteomics of Egg White • 16.1. Introduction • 16.2. Egg White Proteins in the Preproteomic Era • 16.3. Basic Proteomic Studies of Egg White • 16.4. Comparative Egg White Proteomics • 16.5. Egg White Proteins in Other Egg Compartments • 16.6. Proteomics Applied to Posttranslational Modifications of Egg White Proteins • 16.7. Proteomic Analysis of Egg White Allergens in Food Section 3. Application to Aquaculture Chapter 17. Proteomics in Aquaculture: Quality and Safety • 17.1. Proteomics Technologies Applied to Aquaculture • 17.2. Proteomics to Evaluate Quality of Aquaculture Species • 17.3. Proteomics to Assess the Potential Risks Associated to Aquaculture • 17.4. Future Perspectives Chapter 18. Proteomics to Assess Fish Quality and Bioactivity • 18.1. Introduction • 18.2. Proteomics to Evaluate Fish Quality • 18.3. Proteomics to Evaluate the Bioactivity of Fish • 18.4. Conclusions and Final Considerations Chapter 19. Proteomic Identification of Commercial Fish Species • 19.1. Introduction • 19.2. Traditional Molecular Strategies for the Identification of Commercial Fish Species • 19.3. Proteomic Methodologies for the Identification of Commercial Fish Species • 19.4. Conclusions and Future Outlook Chapter 20. Food Authentication of Seafood Species • 20.1. Introduction • 20.2. Gel-Based Methods • 20.3. MS-Based Methods • 20.4. Future Trends Chapter 21. Proteomic Analysis of Disease in Sydney Rock Oysters • 21.1. Introduction • 21.2. Proteomic Analysis of Diseases in Oysters • 21.3. Case Study—Recent Work in Our Laboratory on Winter Mortality Disease • 21.4. Oyster Selective Breeding Programs • 21.5. Conclusions and Future Outlook Section 4. Processed Foods Chapter 22. Proteomics of Fermented Milk Products • 22.1. Introduction • 22.2. Qualitative and Quantitative Proteomic Tools Used to Study Milk Fermented Products • 22.3. Techno-Functionalities of Dairy Microorganisms Through the Prism of Proteomics • 22.4. Peptidomics of Fermented Milk Products • 22.5. Probiotics Dairy Microorganisms: How Bacteria Express Their Health Benefits • 22.6. Future Challenges Chapter 23. Proteomic Analysis of Beer • 23.1. Introduction • 23.2. The Origin of Proteins and Peptides in Beer • 23.3. The Characterization of Beer Proteome • 23.4. Technological Role of Beer Polypeptides • 23.5. Immunological Aspects of Beer Proteins and Peptides Chapter 24. Proteomics of Grapevines and Wines • 24.1. Introduction • 24.2. Proteomics Methodologies in Food Products • 24.3. Additives in Wine • 24.4. Proteomics of Grapevine Berries • 24.5. Proteomics of Wine and Other Alcoholic Beverages • 24.6. Conclusions Section 5. Food Spoilage, Pathogenic Organisms and Allergens Chapter 25. Proteomics of Food Spoilage Pathogens • 25.1. Introduction • 25.2. MALDI-TOF MS Fingerprinting for Bacterial Identification of Food Spoilage Pathogens • 25.3. Foodborne Pathogen Detection by LC-ESI-MS • 25.4. Typing of Food Spoilage Pathogens by Proteomics Chapter 26. Biotyping Meets Proteomics: Mass Spectrometry-Based Approaches for Characterization of Microorganisms • 26.1. Introduction • 26.2. Library-Based Approach • 26.3. Proteomics-Based Approaches Chapter 27. Proteomics Analyses Applied to the Human Foodborne Bacterial Pathogen Campylobacter spp. • 27.1. Introduction—An Overview of Campylobacter • 27.2. The Adaptive Tolerance Response (ATR) of Campylobacter • 27.3. Sample Preparation for Proteomics Analyses • 27.4. Subproteomic Approaches for Campylobacter Analysis • 27.5. Posttranslational Modifications (PTMs) • 27.6. Conclusions Chapter 28. Proteomic Approaches for Allergen Analysis in Crop Plants • 28.1. Introduction • 28.2. Allergen Identification in Crop Plants • 28.3. Determining the Qualitative and Quantitative Variability of Allergens Among Crop Plants • 28.4. Proteomics for the Assessment of Allergenicity in GM Crop Plants • 28.5. Conclusions Chapter 29. Detection of Microbial Toxins by -Omics Methods: A Growing Role of Proteomics • 29.1. Introduction—Bacterial Foodborne Pathogens and Their Toxins • 29.2. High-Throughput Technologies for Detection of Bacterial Foodborne Pathogens and Their Toxins • 29.3. Gene Expression Analysis—Transcriptomics, Proteomics • 29.4. Proteomics of Food Pathogen Fungi and Mycotoxins • 29.5. Marine Biotoxins

COMPANY
QUICK LINKS
SOCIAL LINKS
Copyright © All rights Reserved | Design by Zaptas Technologies